Falling over each other to make good wine (chardonnay grape variety)

>> Wednesday, 16 February 2011

white grapes delivered on a conveyor belt chardonnay clos des langres ardhuy nuits-st-georges cote de nuits burgundy france


Chardonnay grape variety, stock photography samples, by Per Karlsson, BKWine.

THIS IS ONLY A SELECTION OF SAMPLES. Use the image SEARCH function to find more relevant photos.

Chardonnay is without a doubt the world's best known white grape variety. It is grown all over the world. Its most sought after wines come from Burgundy in France.

Chardonnay as described in Wikipedia: "Chardonnay is a green-skinned grape variety used to make white wine. It is believed to have originated in the Burgundy wine region of eastern France but is now grown wherever wine is produced, from England to New Zealand. For new and developing wine regions, growing Chardonnay is seen as a "rite of passage" and an easy segue into the international wine market.

The Chardonnay grape itself is very neutral, with many of the flavors commonly associated with the grape being derived from such influences as terroir and oak. It is vinified in many different styles, from the rich, buttery Meursaults to New World wines with tropical fruit flavors.

Chardonnay is an important component of many sparkling wines around the world, including Champagne. A peak in popularity in the late 1980s gave way to a backlash among those wine drinkers who saw the grape as a leading negative component of the globalization of wine. Nonetheless, it remains one of the most widely-planted grape varieties, with over 400,000 acres (175,000 hectares) worldwide, second only to Airén among white wine grapes and planted in more wine regions than any other grape - including Cabernet Sauvignon."

All images © copyright Per Karlsson, BKWine. Images may not be used without our permission.

Grape Variety: Chardonnay - stock photo samples - Images by Per Karlsson

If you want to see more photos on this: follow the link above.

- TIP 1: You can 'grab' this slide show and embed it on your site. Click the 'share' button.

- TIP 2: Click the 'full screen' button if you want to see the images in larger size.


Post a Comment

Related Posts with Thumbnails


  © Blogger template Webnolia by Ourblogtemplates.com 2009

Back to TOP